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Use this President’s Day to teach your children the value of money – literally! First do our coin rubbing activity, then use various coins to practice counting, learn about money, and more.

What You’ll Need:
*coins
*paper
*colored pencils or crayons

Preparation:
*Make sure you have enough coins to do the activities below. If not, just adjust the numbers accordingly.

Activity:
*Show your child each coin and the president featured on them. The penny shows our 16th president, Abraham Lincoln. The nickel shows Thomas Jefferson, our 3rd president. The dime shows our 32nd president, Franklin Roosevelt. The quarter shows our 1st president, George Washington. The half-dollar shows John F. Kennedy, our 35th president.
*Have your child do coin rubbings of the presidents by laying a piece of paper over the coin and gently rubbing with crayon or colored pencil.
*Starting with pennies, explain that each penny is worth one cent, and practice counting by 1s by counting out 10 pennies. Explain how 5 pennies equals a nickel, 10 pennies equals a dime, 25 pennies equals a quarter, 50 pennies equals a half-dollar, and 100 pennies equals a dollar. Depending on the ages of your children, you can count them out as well.
*Now move on to nickels and explain how each nickel is worth 5 cents, or 5 pennies. Practice counting by 1s and count out 10 nickels. Then count by 5s to show the value of those nickels. Explain how 2 nickels equals a dime, 5 nickels equals a quarter, 10 nickels equals a half-dollar, and 20 nickels equals a dollar. Depending on the ages of your children, you can count them out as well.
*Moving on to dimes, explain that each dime is worth one cent, or 10 pennies. Practice counting by 1s by counting out ten dimes. Then count by 10s to show the value of those dimes. Explain how 10 pennies equals a dime, 2 nickels equals a dime, 5 dimes equals a half-dollar, and 10 dimes equals a dollar. Depending on the ages of your children, you can count them out as well.
*Using quarters, explain how each is worth 25 cents or 25 pennies. Practice counting by 1s and count out 4 quarters. Then count by 25s to show the value of those quarters. Explain how 25 pennies equals one quarter, 5 nickels equals one quarter, 2 quarters equals one half-dollar, and 4 quarters equals one dollar.
*Now use combinations of coins to come up with different money values.

Suggested Resources:
• Visit this site from the United States Mint for fun facts for kids about coins.
The Kid's Guide to Collecting Statehood Quarters and Other Cool Coins! - from Amazon for 1 cent plus shipping!
• Don’t forget to send us pictures of your kids doing this activity and we may post them on our site! info@mycalendarmaker.com

This activity can be found in the Holiday and Games/Activities sections of our site.